Bermuda lashed by heavy winds from Cat 3 Hurricane Humberto

Vehicles splash through heavy water filling Chimney Rock, south of Brays Bayou in Houston, Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2019. Officials in the Houston area were preparing high-water vehicles and staging rescue boats Tuesday as Tropical Storm Imelda moved in from the Gulf of Mexico, threatening to dump up to 18 inches of rain in parts of Southeast Texas and southwestern Louisiana over the next few days. (Mark Mulligan/Houston Chronicle via AP)
A woman closes her umbrella after getting into her car during a rain storm stemming from rain bands spawned by Tropical Storm Imelda near I-45 and Almeda-Genoa on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2019, in Houston. (Brett Coomer/Houston Chronicle via AP)/Houston Chronicle via AP
Cots fill the gym at Cedarbridge Academy which will be used as a shelter during the passing of Hurricane Humberto in Devonshire, Bermuda, Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2019. Bermuda’s government called up troops and urged people on the British Atlantic island to make final preparations for an expected close brush Wednesday with Hurricane Humberto, a powerful Category 3 storm. Authorities ordered early closings of schools, transportation and government offices. (AP Photo/Akil J. Simmons)
Pedestrians hold on to their umbrellas while a gust of wind blows at them at Fanning and Polk Streets as Tropical Storm Imelda makes its way across the Houston area during rush hour on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2019, in downtown Houston. (Yi-Chin Lee/Houston Chronicle via AP)
A pedestrian walks through the patio area of the GreenStreet as Tropical Storm Imelda is making its way across the Houston area during rush hour on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2019, in downtown Houston. (Yi-Chin Lee/Houston Chronicle via AP)
Seventeen-month-old Kalin Mulligan reaches for a fish with the help of his father, Ryan Mulligan, as his mother Noon shields them from the rain, in the Japanese Garden in Hermann Park, on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2019, in Houston. "It's been so hot, just a reprieve from the heat," Ryan Mulligan said when asked why the family came out in the rain. (Jon Shapley/Houston Chronicle via AP)
A postal truck drives through floodwaters from Tropical Depression Imelda, Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2019, in Galveston, Texas. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
Workers take down a tent frame in preparation for Hurricane Humberto in Hamilton, Bermuda, Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2019. Bermuda’s government called up troops and urged people on the British Atlantic island to make final preparations for an expected close brush Wednesday with Hurricane Humberto, a powerful Category 3 storm. Authorities ordered early closings of schools, transportation and government offices. (AP Photo/Akil J. Simmons)
Felipe Morales works on getting his truck out of a ditch filled with high water during a rain storm stemming from rain bands spawned by Tropical Storm Imelda on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2019, in Houston. He was able to get help when a man with a truck helped pull him from the ditch. (Brett Coomer/Houston Chronicle via AP)
Linda Orndorff, right, adjusts the hood of Candy Lester's rain poncho as they explore The Strand in Galveston, Texas on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2019. The two, from Florida, were trying to make the best of the rainy weather. Heavy rain from Tropical Storm Imelda is expected to soak Galveston County and could cause flooding. (Jennifer Reynolds/The Galveston County Daily News via AP)
Clouds hover over downtown Houston ahead of Tropical Storm Imelda Tuesday, Sept. 18, 2019. The storm is forecast to bring heavy rainfall to the upper Texas coast over next few days. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
People board up an Urban Cottage store in preparation for Hurricane Humberto in Hamilton, Bermuda, Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2019. Bermuda’s government called up troops and urged people on the British Atlantic island to make final preparations for an expected close brush Wednesday with Hurricane Humberto, a powerful Category 3 storm. Authorities ordered early closings of schools, transportation and government offices. (AP Photo/Akil J. Simmons)

MIAMI — Hurricane Humberto lashed Bermuda with strong winds Wednesday night as the powerful Category 3 storm passed just to the north of the British Atlantic territory, while another growing storm threatened tourist resorts along Mexico's Pacific coast.

Bermuda Gov. John Rankin called up 120 members of the Royal Bermuda Regiment to prepare for possible storm recovery efforts and National Security Minister Wayne Caines cautioned everyone to stay inside. Authorities had ordered early closings of schools, clinics and government offices.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center said hurricane-force winds began to hit the island of some 70,000 people by late afternoon and would last into early Thursday.

Humberto's maximum sustained winds held at 120 mph (195 kph) and the storm was centered about 75 miles (120 kilometers) north of Bermuda on Wednesday night. It was moving east-northeast at 20 mph (31 kph).

James Dodgson, director of the Bermuda Weather Service, warned that the storm could produce tornadoes and dangerous storm surge.

"Humberto's a big hurricane and we're looking at the conditions already deteriorating. There's some very strong winds kicking in, particularly this evening," he said.

Caines said non-emergency medical services would be closed until Thursday. Evening flights from the U.S. and Britain were canceled.

"We'd like to ask all of Bermuda to prepare for the storm, to know that the government and everyone is rooting for us, and we can get through this," Caines said. "We've been through this before."

Meanwhile, Tropical Storm Lorena posed an increasing threat to tourist resorts on Mexico's Pacific Coast and the Baja California Peninsula.

Forecasters said Lorena was expected to pass "near or over the coast" somewhere between the port of Manzanillo and Puerto Vallarta on Wednesday night and Thursday, while growing toward hurricane force. The still-uncertain long-term forecast track showed it approaching the Los Cabos resort area Friday night and Saturday.

Maximum sustained winds were 70 mph (110 kph) by evening. It was centered about 60 miles (110 kilometers) south-southeast of Manzanillo and was moving northwest at 12 mph (19 kph).

Hurricane warnings were in effect from Punta San Telmo to Cabo Corrientes.

Heavy rains were spreading onshore along the coast, the Hurricane Center said. Mexican officials voiced concern that some parts of southern Mexico, which have seen a lack of rainfall, could now get torrential rains that could result in dangerous flash floods and landslides.

In parts of Colima, Jalisco and Michoacan states, "it is forecast that the total accumulations of rain could ... represent 40% of the rain for an entire year in that part of the country," said Blanca Jiménez Cisneros, director-general of Mexico's National Water Commission.

Classes were suspended in Colima as a precaution.

In Texas, the remnants of Tropical Storm Imelda drenched parts of Southeast Texas, but officials in the Houston region said that so far there had been no severe problems. It was the first named storm to hit that area since Hurricane Harvey's much heavier rains flooded more than 150,000 homes around the city and caused an estimated $125 billion in damage in Texas.

Tropical Storm Jerry also formed Wednesday morning far out in the Atlantic and was forecast to become a hurricane as it nears the outermost Caribbean islands Thursday night or Friday.

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