New Orleans museum shows art collected by namesake duke

In this Oct. 24, 2018 photo, New Orleans Museum of Art curator Vanessa Schmid discusses the interplay between two of the paintings collected by Philippe II, duke of Orleans, the man New Orleans was named for in New Orleans. About 30 of the paintings he collected are together for the first time in centuries as an exhibit marking the city's tricentennial. (AP Photo/Janet McConnaughey)
In this Oct. 24, 2018 photo, a bust of the man New Orleans is named for, Philippe II, duke of Orleans, and several of the paintings in a new exhibit of work collected by the duke are displayed at the New Orleans Museum of Art in New Orleans. About 30 items from the duke's collection are together for the first time in centuries thanks to loans from dozens of museums across the United States and Europe. The exhibit, part of New Orleans' tricentennial celebrations, will be open to the public from Oct. 26 through Jan. 27, 2019. (AP Photo/New Orleans)
In this Oct. 24, 2018 photo, New Orleans Museum of Art curator Vanessa Schmid describes "The Mill" by Rembrandt van Rijn, as one of America's great treasures and the climax to an exhibition of paintings collected by the man New Orleans was named after, Philippe II, duke of Orleans at the New Orleans Museum of Art in New Orleans. The collected works by the duke from Oct. 26 through Jan. 27, 2019, as part of the city's tricentennial celebrations. (AP Photo/Janet McConnaughey)

NEW ORLEANS — The New Orleans Museum of Art is winding up the city's tricentennial with an exhibition of dozens of paintings collected by the man the city is named for: Philippe II, Duke of Orleans.

The duke owned 772 paintings when he died in 1723. Now 30 of them are back together for the first time in centuries, thanks to loans from museums across the United States and Europe. The exhibit runs Friday through Jan. 27.

The duke's grandson, known as "Philippe Egalite" (Philippe Equality) sold most of the paintings in the early 1790s to help finance the French Revolution and pay his own bills. The paintings were then re-sold by two London art dealers, who first put them on public exhibition in what became the world's first blockbuster art exhibits.

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Online:

The Orleans Collection: https://noma.org/exhibitions/the-orleans-collection/

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